Rebekka Denz, Rafael Arnold, Silviu Costachie, Michael Dallapiazza, Anat Feinberg, Elvira Grözinger, Karl E. Grözinger, William Hiscott, Per Jegebäck, Grazyna Jurewicz, Daniel Jütte, Robert Jütte, Elena Keidosiute, Ulrich Knufinke, Stefan Lang, Joanna Lisek, Diana I. Popescu, Maria Radosav, Ingedore Rüdlin, Anna Rutkowski, Peter Salner, Michael Szulc, Suanne Talabardon, Tamas Visi, Kerry Wallach
Rebekka Denz; Grazyna Jurewicz (eds.)

Geographical Turn

ISBN: 978-3-86956-055-7
265 pages
Release year 2010

Series: PaRDeS : Zeitschrift der Vereinigung für Jüdische Studien e.V. , 16

8,00 

Out of the editorial: Limitless popularisation can make scientific research hell.
Ideas and concepts
   – once they’ve been let out into the world – can mutate into rumours. Their
   truthfulness, which becomes more questionable over time, decreases, while their
   acceptance in society is constantly increasing. The title of this year’s edition
   of PaRDeS deals with the turn concept, one of the terms, that reaches cult
   status after they have been taken away from scientific research. On the long
   list of turns, which can be found in the arts subjects, among them including
   Linguistics, Cultural, Pictorial, Spatial, Sensual, Performative, and Semiotic,
   is also Geographical Turn. The concept of ‘turn’ is understood as an appearance
   of a new paradigm, through which the until then unseen comes to light and must
   be systematically ordered according to the theme. In the case of the
   Geographical Turn, the ‘unseen’ is in reference to Judaism on the other side of
   Germany’s Eastern border. Consciously, the German counter-part to the English
   term is here avoided, because the processes of self-assurance and self-assertion
   must be ordered according to themes within the international research
   community. In order to complete the mental map of the academic research into
   Judaism, with its two centres of Israel and the USA, the direction is set
   towards the East, where new things in the field of Jewish studies are being
   achieved. In the texts selected here by authors chosen from Romania, Lithuania,
   Poland, the Czech Republic, and the Slovak Republic, the actual research on the
   Jewish religion and culture in Middle and Eastern Europe is presented: The difference
   in the topics discussed and the questions asked as well as the width of the
   geographical and temporal fields, show how many areas of interest there are and
   how large these areas are. 
    
Out of the editorial: Limitless popularisation can make scientific research hell.
Ideas and concepts
   – once they’ve been let out into the world – can mutate into rumours. Their
   truthfulness, which becomes more questionable over time, decreases, while their
   acceptance in society is constantly increasing. The title of this year’s edition
   of PaRDeS deals with the turn concept, one of the terms, that reaches cult
   status after they have been taken away from scientific research. On the long
   list of turns, which can be found in the arts subjects, among them including
   Linguistics, Cultural, Pictorial, Spatial, Sensual, Performative, and Semiotic,
   is also Geographical Turn. The concept of ‘turn’ is understood as an appearance
   of a new paradigm, through which the until then unseen comes to light and must
   be systematically ordered according to the theme. In the case of the
   Geographical Turn, the ‘unseen’ is in reference to Judaism on the other side of
   Germany’s Eastern border. Consciously, the German counter-part to the English
   term is here avoided, because the processes of self-assurance and self-assertion
   must be ordered according to themes within the international research
   community. In order to complete the mental map of the academic research into
   Judaism, with its two centres of Israel and the USA, the direction is set
   towards the East, where new things in the field of Jewish studies are being
   achieved. In the texts selected here by authors chosen from Romania, Lithuania,
   Poland, the Czech Republic, and the Slovak Republic, the actual research on the
   Jewish religion and culture in Middle and Eastern Europe is presented: The difference
   in the topics discussed and the questions asked as well as the width of the
   geographical and temporal fields, show how many areas of interest there are and
   how large these areas are.